Seriously. We’ve all been there.

In my case, it’s hitting send on an email and realizing I sent it to the wrong list.

It’s seeing the final email launch after four people reviewed it, and there’s a type-o in the subject line.

It’s checking the date of an event five times, and you saved and sent the wrong version.

And then begins the endless cycle of beating yourself up.

Running through every possible worst-case-scenario in your head.

I just lost a client.

No one is ever going to think I can do anything ever again.

I’m going to get fired.

I just lost a ton of money.

My customers are going to hate my brand and complain about me on social media.

I’m here to tell you, that it is going to be okay.

Seriously. It is going to be okay.

Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone.

Anyone who tries to tell you there isn’t room for mistakes is seriously delusional.

We are all human. And messing up is inevitable.

 

The best part about messing up?

 

You learn from it. 

 

Some of the best lessons I’ve learned are from falling flat on my faced. Take your mistake, learn what you did wrong and find a way to correct it in the future.

 

Most of the time, when I make a mistake, it’s because I need to do one of a few things:

 

1. Slow. Down.

 

I am doing too many things at once and trying to get through them all, so I speed through my task and miss something.

 

That’s inevitably because I’m working myself too hard and/or have taken on too much.

 

2. Ask for help.

 

This is part of that taking on too much thing. It’s okay to say you can’t do it all.

 

Because guess what? You can’t. Sorry to break it to you.

 

We are only one person. If things *keep falling through the cracks* it usually means that what we are doing and how we are doing it is unsustainable.

 

3. Say you’re sorry.

 

Admitting when you’ve made a mistake is much more respected than you think. 

 

People appreciate it when someone can be a grown up and admit when they’ve messed up.

 

There’s nothing worse than someone who comes up with a million excuses on why something wasn’t their fault.

 

Saying you’re sorry and how you’re going to do better next time lets people know you care enough to correct your mistakes.

Cut yourself some slack.

I’m here to tell you that today, this day. Right now. You need to cut yourself some slack.

You’re probably either the only person on your team doing this job, or you’re a soloprenuer trying to figure everything out. No one can expect you to be 100% on your game at all times.

If you’re not feeling overwhelmed right this moment, that’s okay. Bookmark this and come back to it when you need it.

Or just bookmark it and keep coming back for those days when you want to crawl in a hole and never come out.

You are human. You are enough. 

Bring it in if you need a virtual hug.

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